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Boekhorststraat 125
The Hague, NL
Boekhorstst. 125, The Hague, NL

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BEFORE AND AFTER THIS.

6 - 27 Feb 2010

Over spoken, monsters, flesgeesten en andere scheve verschijningen

Over spoken, monsters, flesgeesten en andere scheve verschijningen

Over spoken, monsters, flesgeesten en andere scheve verschijningen

an exhibition by Ann Veronica Janssens, Bart Lodewijks, Berlinde De Bruyckere, Bernd Lohaus, Damien De Lepeleire, Dirk Braeckman, Elly Strik, Gerlach En Koop, Johan De Wilde, Julia Wlodkowski, Kati Heck, Nadia Naveau, Nathalie Guilmot, Raoul De Keyser, Rein Dufait, Ronald Ophuis, Tamara Van San, Walter Swennes curated by Hans Theys
Artists see ghosts, because the conventional images that they are supposed to drape over reality, do not convince them…

The show consists of new works by Tamara Van San and Bart Lodewijks created on location next to about twenty works of art selected by Theys ( ghosts become tangible, in his own words ).

Sketching the idea at the core of this exhibition, Hans Theys writes:

When I wrote last year that the work of Tamara Van San ‘staged the eternal emergence of images from matter’, I was thinking about the young hero of “À la recherche du temps perdu” who in vain tried to discover how objects evoke images, thoughts and feelings ( unaware that those images and feelings came from within himself ).

Artists see ghosts, because the conventional images that they are supposed to drape over reality, do not convince them. The old way of looking at things no longer works for them. Reality bursts through the thin membrane we try to stretch over it and presents itself as unrecognizable, unknowable, untamed and uncontrollable.

On the other hand, artists have the ability to see structures where there are none. Their new shapes move us, because they seem to broaden our world by showing us a new way to look at things. We are moved because we recognize the fragile and unstable world that we vaguely remember from our childhood, when things had no fixed form or name; or the world of our dreams, in which that unstable world continues to exist freely.